Brew Guides.

Pourover – V60.

Similar to it’s electronic counterpart -, the automatic drip machine, drip coffee or the Pourover is one of the most simple and elegant ways to manually brew, and is arguably the cleanest way to draw out the best qualities of your coffee.

There are many different types of brewers with slightly different designs – V60, Kalita Wave and the Chemex, just to name a few but the basic concept and approach remains the same no matter which device you’re brewing with.

What you need.

Pourover brewer, filter paper, gram scale, timer, whole beans, grinder, filtered water and your favourite mug.

Step

1.

Decide how much coffee you wish to brew and how strong you wish it to be.

Start with a ratio of water to coffee of 17:1. This means we will be brewing with 17 parts of water for every part of coffee. So for a single serve we'd recommend 15g of coffee to 255g of water (15 x 17 = 255).

Brewing for 2? Simply double this to 30g / 510g.

Step

2.

Weigh out your coffee on scales and grind. We're looking for a relatively coarse grind that resembles coarse sea salt.

Step

3.

Fill your kettle with good filtered water and bring to the boil.

Step

4.

Place folded paper filter in the Pourover and sit on top of your mug.

Step

5.

Pour in 150 grams of hot water, fully rinsing the filter of an undesirable papery taste and preheating the vessel and your mug.

Step

6.

Now that your brewer and cup is warm, empty the water out. Pour the ground coffee into the filter, giving it a slight shake to level the grounds to allow a more even extraction.

Step

7.

Place your brewer and mug on your scale and reset your timer to zero.

Step

8.

Start your brew with a "bloom" by pouring 3 x the amount of water as coffee. E.g. If you're brewing 15g of coffee then pour 45g/ml of water in a gentle circular fashion and let it sit until your timer reads 45 seconds. We recommend gently swirling the pourover in a 360 motion which greatly helps evenly wet all the grounds thus "setting up" the rest of the brew.

Step

9.

At 45 seconds begin to pour the rest of your water slowly in a circular motion and finish by pouring down the sides of the paper filter to wash any grinds of that stick to the sides. Pour to when your scale reads your final brew weight which is the weight of the total water we need to reach our desired brew ratio. E.g. for 15g this is 255g/ml of water.

Step

10.

A final swirl of the pourover at this stage will greatly help the evenness of the final "drawdown" of water.

Step

11.

Note the final brew time which is when the coffee liquid has completely stopped dripping out the exit. This brew time is a very good indicator of your grind. A 15g brew should take around 2:30 to 3:00. Anything less indicates too coarse a grind and anything longer may indicate too fine a grind, although it is quite forgiving.
Expect to add around 30s for each 10g you add to your brew, so aim for 3:00 - 3:30 for a 25g brew.

Now it’s time to enjoy.

* 1 gram water = 1 millilitre water
** When making filter coffee, our final brew will be about 98.5% water so good filtered water is an absolute critical thing to have when trying to bring out the most in your brews.

French Press.

French press coffee is big and bold, yet quite elegant as it can reveal beautiful subtleties in coffee. This seldom used brewing method is often criticised for producing dirty, dry bitter coffee. But if you’ve got fresh roasted coffee and follow the right steps, the French press can really earn its place on the counter in any home or coffee bar.

What you need.

French press, gram scale, timer, whole beans, grinder, filtered water and your favourite mug.

Step

1.

Weigh out and grind 15g of coffee. French press calls for a quite course grind so it should resemble course sand.

Step

2.

Bring 350ml of filtered water to the boil and pour 100ml into your French press to pre-heat. Set aside the remaining 250ml for approximately 45 seconds to reach the desired brewing temperature, which is 94-96 degrees.

Step

3.

Empty water out of the French press. Place your ground coffee inside and then pour in the remaining 250ml of water, wetting all of the coffee. Give the coffee two full stirs with either a bamboo paddle or chopstick (you don’t want to crack the glass using a spoon). Place the plunger on top, and press down the mesh screen so it sits just above the water. Start your timer for four minutes.

Step

4.

Slowly press the plunger down to the bottom. If it’s hard to press, it means your grind is too fine; if falls to rapidly, your grind is too coarse.

Now it’s time to enjoy.

Tips. if you find you’d like a little more body in your coffee, increase coffee dose to 20g. To make coffee in a larger or smaller French press, just follow this simple brew ratio: 60g coffee to every 1 litre of water.

Aeropress.

This rather strange apparatus was conceived by the folks who brought us the Aerobie flying disc in the 1980’s. The AeroPress is extremely durable and easily portable, making it a great option for both travellers and home users. It produces a beautiful, full bodied brew, while still allowing all the more subtle qualities of the coffee to shine through.

What you need.

AeroPress, gram scale, timer, filtered water, grinder, whole beans and your favourite mug

Step

1.

Bring to a boil about 400 grams of water enough to fill both the AeroPress and your mug.

Step

2.

Place a paper filter inside the detachable plastic cap.

Step

3.

Weigh out and grind 15 grams of coffee. You want a fine grind for Aeropress - just a little finer than you would for a Pourover/ V60 or as coarse as table salt.

Step

4.

Assemble the AeroPress by pushing the rubber end of the narrower vessel into the wider vessel so it sits inside, just below the number 4 mark. Residual moisture in the Aeropress can affect the seal, so make sure it’s all dry.

Step

5.

Sit the Aeropress on the scale, cap side up so that the numbers are upside-down.

Step

6.

Tip in the ground coffee.

Step

7.

Pour in 30 grams of water. Your water should be between 94 – 96 degrees, or about 45 seconds off boil.

Step

8.

Use a chopstick or bamboo paddle to gently immerse the grounds in the water. You don’t want to stir the coffee grounds, just make sure they’re all evenly saturated. Set your timer and leave for 30 seconds.

Step

9.

Pour in another 160 grams of water. Leave to sit for one minute.

Step

10.

While you’re waiting, use the remaining water (about 100 grams) to wet the filter and help it stick to the cap. Pour the water over your mug so it heats up and then tip out.

Step

11.

After one minute, give your grounds 10 stirs.

Step

12.

Screw the cap onto the AeroPress. You’re in very close proximity to seriously hot coffee here, so please be careful.

Step

13.

Flip the whole assembly over with haste. Position it atop your mug and begin applying downward pressure. If the pushing feels too easy, your grind is likely too coarse; if it’s very hard to push, chances are the grind is a bit too fine. Your coffee’s fully brewed once it begins to make a hissing sound.

This means there’s no more water to push through the device.
Simply unscrew the brew cap and push the coffee puck straight into the bin and rinse out for your next cup.

Enjoy.

note. This is the upside-down or inversion method – you can use the AeroPress right side up, but this can cause some leakage and makes the process a little more tricky.

For further assistance in alternative brew methods not listed here please use the 'contact us' page and get in touch, we'd be more than happy to help.